My WonderMom on Curlers! Happy Mother’s day!

My WonderMom on Curlers! Happy Mother’s day!

Love and Everything Else Around Us.

Love and Everything Else Around Us.

pinoytumblr:

Alex Compton: On Filipinos, Fil-Ams, and his love affair with the Philippines
I WAS BORN IN MANILA, at Makati Med. My parents were Southeast Asian scholars; they met in the Peace Corps in Thailand in the 1960s. My dad’s first job, after completing his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, was at the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction in Silang, Cavite.
My dad’s job was for two years. We left the Philippines when I was six months old, and I grew up in the States.
My parents are some of the whitest Asian people you will ever meet; both my parents are fluent in Thai and Lao, and they had a lot of Filipino friends. My dad was a professor, and my mom worked in the Southeast Asian studies department at Cornell, and one of our friends was a Filipino who taught Tagalog there.
But I’d never been to the Philippines when I came back in 1998. Coming to play basketball here was a complete accident. I was the captain of the Cornell basketball team, and I always spent time at the coaches’ office, talking to them, breaking down film.
I was talking to one of our assistant coaches, Tyrone Pitts, who played as an import in the Philippine Basketball League. At the time, I didn’t know he played in the Philippines, I just knew he played around the world as an import. I just asked him where he played, how that was like, because I loved traveling, and obviously my background is international.
And he just mentioned this story, “In 1991, I played in the Philippines.” And I was just, like, “Wow, you played in the Philippines? That’s where I was born, that’s crazy!” And that’s where the whole thing started. He said, “You were born there? Can you play there? Basketball over there is huge, you have no idea. You’ll be hanging out with movie stars, it’s wild!”
Read more.
(What’s a Filipino? Whether you agree with him or not, broadcaster Arnold Clavio’s “They’re-not real-Filipinos” criticism of Azkals players following a sexual harassment suit brought against some members of the national football team, appears to have hit a raw nerve – and raised an important question. This article is one of a series exploring the very notion of “being Filipino”. Follow @interaksyon on our #WhatsaFilipino discussion on Twitter, and on this special coverage on InterAksyon.com.)

pinoytumblr:

Alex Compton: On Filipinos, Fil-Ams, and his love affair with the Philippines

I WAS BORN IN MANILA, at Makati Med. My parents were Southeast Asian scholars; they met in the Peace Corps in Thailand in the 1960s. My dad’s first job, after completing his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, was at the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction in Silang, Cavite.

My dad’s job was for two years. We left the Philippines when I was six months old, and I grew up in the States.

My parents are some of the whitest Asian people you will ever meet; both my parents are fluent in Thai and Lao, and they had a lot of Filipino friends. My dad was a professor, and my mom worked in the Southeast Asian studies department at Cornell, and one of our friends was a Filipino who taught Tagalog there.

But I’d never been to the Philippines when I came back in 1998. Coming to play basketball here was a complete accident. I was the captain of the Cornell basketball team, and I always spent time at the coaches’ office, talking to them, breaking down film.

I was talking to one of our assistant coaches, Tyrone Pitts, who played as an import in the Philippine Basketball League. At the time, I didn’t know he played in the Philippines, I just knew he played around the world as an import. I just asked him where he played, how that was like, because I loved traveling, and obviously my background is international.

And he just mentioned this story, “In 1991, I played in the Philippines.” And I was just, like, “Wow, you played in the Philippines? That’s where I was born, that’s crazy!” And that’s where the whole thing started. He said, “You were born there? Can you play there? Basketball over there is huge, you have no idea. You’ll be hanging out with movie stars, it’s wild!”

Read more.

(What’s a Filipino? Whether you agree with him or not, broadcaster Arnold Clavio’s “They’re-not real-Filipinos” criticism of Azkals players following a sexual harassment suit brought against some members of the national football team, appears to have hit a raw nerve – and raised an important question. This article is one of a series exploring the very notion of “being Filipino”. Follow @interaksyon on our #WhatsaFilipino discussion on Twitter, and on this special coverage on InterAksyon.com.)

Reblogged from pinoytumblr with 233 notes

nasaannanamanbasisingqupado:

Smashing Pumpkins Webisode #2 - Rhinoceros

Reblogged from qudo with 1 note

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andeverythinginbetween:

Tori Amos - Sleeps With Butterflies


You say the word you know I will find you 

Or if you need some time I don’t mind

I don’t hold on to the tail of your kite

Reblogged from andeverythinginbetween with 2 notes

Reblogged from call-me-maybe-amore with 23,301 notes

katrinajune:

blahblahblahox on Xanga on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/20796850

katrinajune:

blahblahblahox on Xanga on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/20796850

Reblogged from iamhappykate with 3 notes

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom - Trailer (2012 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE) from Tsunami Blossom on Vimeo.

skysignal:

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom trailer.

Reblogged from skysignal with 45 notes

(Source: favoritelittlelyrics)

suzy1010:

Movie ‘Introduction to Architecture Official poster

Reblogged from suzy1010 with 20 notes

heidisayswhat:

Plus/Minus - I’ve Been Lost

All of the things that I had planned
On the back burner
Not in hand
If it all fell apart today
What would I have to show for it? 
 
Back in the foreground don’t you see?
Dressed like a stone and constantly
Everything’s coming back to me
Everything’s set for me to be. 
 
Try to understand
I’ve been lost 

Ending, beginning
What’s the use?
It doesn’t matter which came first
Standing up straight was never right
Kneeling upright is even worse 

Try to understand
I’ve been lost
Not the only one
Ready to come down.

Reblogged from heidisayswhat with 5 notes

basterrda:

It’s never too late to change anything.

basterrda:

It’s never too late to change anything.

Reblogged from marychristinegalang with 8 notes